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Domestic Violence: Population-Specific Approaches

In an effort to respond to the diverse experiences of victims and survivors of domestic violence, services must be individualized to meet the unique needs of each population and/or community. The resources included here present a starting point for considering the various issues that impact the lives of victims and survivors in specific populations.

NOTE: VAWnet staff and consultants are aware of the potential implications of "listing" various populations and communities in finite and discreet categories. We are engaging in ongoing discussion and struggle to fairly present the available materials and to remain accessible to those seeking the information. We also are aware that individuals are dynamic and find themselves in many "categories" at one time or another, and therefore we are attempting to ensure that all materials are cross-listed in as many relevant sections as possible so that the information will be utilized to the fullest of their potential.

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Currently Viewing Results for "Batterers as Parents":

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September 2013
This paper provides a historical and research overview of Parental Alienation Syndrome and Parental Alienation, identifies strategic issues for advocates working with victims, and offers guidelines to improve courts’ treatment of these issues.
Authors: Joan S. Meier
January 2009
This VAWnet document provides a historical and research overview of Parental Alienation Syndrome and Parental Alienation, identifies strategic issues for advocates working with victims, and offers guidelines to improve courtsĂ­ treatment of these issues.
Authors: Joan S. Meier
Revised October 2007
Describes major legal and social trends surrounding custody and visitation decisions and the social science evidence supporting the need to consider domestic violence. Recommendations for custody and visitation decisions are explored.
Authors: Daniel G. Saunders in consultation with Karen Oehme
August 1998
This document highlights some of the legal and cultural trends surrounding custody and visitation decisions and identifies a strong need to consider more carefully the dynamics of domestic violence in these decisions.
Authors: Daniel G. Saunders