Engagement &amp; Collaboration Content Topic Results https://vawnet.org/materials/engagement-collaboration?field_author_target_id&field_publisher_target_id en Legislative Advocacy for Nonprofit Organizations https://vawnet.org/sc/legislative-advocacy-nonprofit-organizations <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Legislative Advocacy for Nonprofit Organizations</span> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-collection-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/sc_page/public/assets/images/img-nonprofit%20lobbying%20sc.jpg?itok=2dtL2-Pl" width="399" height="366" alt="rotary phone" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sc-page" /> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/berdman" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">berdman</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 06/21/2017 - 14:11</span> <div class="field field--name-field-published-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Published</div> <div class="field__item">July 01, 2017</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Author(s)</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/author/breckan-erdman" hreflang="en">Breckan Erdman</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/author/rosie-hidalgo" hreflang="en">Rosie Hidalgo</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/author/shaina-goodman" hreflang="en">Shaina Goodman</a></div> </div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="flag.link_builder:build" arguments="0=node&amp;1=9467&amp;2=bookmark" token="rI-vMEgh5LSab3yo8bKsIZ3n3o59k36wgAaweX8akOY"></drupal-render-placeholder> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Legislative action has long played an important role in the movement to end gender-based violence, often as a critical component of the grassroots activism of survivors, advocates, and other people committed to mobilizing to end gender-based violence (<a href="http://www.icadvinc.org/what-is-domestic-violence/history-of-battered-womens-movement/">ICADV 2009</a>). In order to have widespread impact and improve the laws, policies and systems that affect victims of gender-based violence, engaging in advocacy with legislators and policymakers at the local, state, and national level is essential.</p> <p>Legislators and policy makers rely on hearing from constituents and community members about ways that laws can be improved to better address domestic and sexual violence. Through legislative advocacy and “lobbying,” domestic and sexual violence organizations can work to “improve policies that are responsive to the needs and realities of survivors as well as their children and families” by connecting legislators to the needs and lived experiences of survivors in their communities (<a href="https://nationallatinonetwork.org/en-about-us/public-policy">National Latin@ Network</a>).  Lobbying is recognized as “a key way that nonprofits can advance their mission, amplify the voices of their supporters, educate policymakers, and protect their values" (<a href="http://www.bolderadvocacy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Amplify-Your-Voice.pdf#sthash.pL8SniHu.dpuf">Bolder Advocacy</a>). As Nayantara Mehta writes, “Getting involved in the legislative process and having a say in policy discussions is not just an appropriate role for nonprofits; it is vital. If nonprofits are not speaking on behalf of their often-vulnerable communities, chances are nobody else is either.” (<a href="https://apps.americanbar.org/buslaw/blt/2009-03-04/mehta.shtml">Mehta 2009</a>).</p> <p>Nonetheless, domestic and sexual violence organizations may hesitate to participate in legislative advocacy due to concerns about or limited understanding of the restrictions on 501(c)(3) nonprofits’ lobbying activities. While some activities, such as endorsing or opposing particular candidates for public office, are strictly prohibited, Congress specifically created rules that permit nonprofit organizations to engage in lobbying, as long as it does not constitute a “substantial part” of the organization’s activities. Additionally, nonprofits can also participate in other advocacy focused on influencing public policy, described in more detail below.</p> <p>This collection is designed to provide assistance to nonprofit organizations interested in participating in legislative advocacy. Resources include materials describing the specific federal regulations limiting lobbying activities of 501(c)(3) nonprofits; details on the ways in which these organizations <i>can</i> participate in lobbying activities; specific information on legislative advocacy for domestic and sexual violence organizations; and useful advocacy tools and tips.</p> <div> <p><i>Please note that this collection is intended to provide general information on these topics and does not constitute legal advice.</i></p> </div> </div> Wed, 21 Jun 2017 18:11:22 +0000 berdman 9467 at https://vawnet.org Housing and Domestic Violence https://vawnet.org/sc/housing-and-dv <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Housing and Domestic Violence</span> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-collection-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/sc_page/public/assets/images/SHPlogo1_0.jpg?itok=48tTZoFF" width="399" height="366" alt="SHP Logo" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sc-page" /> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/ckeene" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ckeene</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 05/12/2017 - 15:43</span> <div class="field field--name-field-published-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Published</div> <div class="field__item">May 23, 2017</div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="flag.link_builder:build" arguments="0=node&amp;1=9361&amp;2=bookmark" token="hgnd8EFpj-M9rshW4ihNLCmCAWY6uNQoGFry-gePJxA"></drupal-render-placeholder> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Survivors of violence face real barriers when trying to access safe housing – barriers caused by the power and control dynamics of abuse, a need for safety and confidentiality, economic instability, the effects of trauma, and the lack of affordable housing in communities. Nobody should have to choose between staying in an unsafe home and having no home at all.</p> <p>This collection offers a doorway to the resources available through <a href="http://safehousingpartnerships.org/" target="_blank">Safe Housing Partnerships</a>, a project of the federal <a href="http://safehousingpartnerships.org/about#sthash.Ubk4Le9M.dpbs" target="_blank">Domestic Violence and Housing Technical Assistance Consortium</a>. The Consortium is an innovative, collaborative approach to providing training, technical assistance, and resource development at the critical intersection of domestic and sexual violence, homelessness, and housing.</p> <p>The resources and tools included here are provided to advance your work at the critical intersection of domestic violence, sexual assault, homelessness, and housing.</p> </div> Fri, 12 May 2017 19:43:15 +0000 ckeene 9361 at https://vawnet.org Reproductive Justice & Violence Against Women: Understanding the Intersections https://vawnet.org/sc/reproductive-justice-violence-against-women-understanding-intersections <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Reproductive Justice &amp; Violence Against Women: Understanding the Intersections</span> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-collection-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/sc_page/public/assets/images/2017-02/SCFeature-ReproJustice_0.jpg?itok=DRAsYzOk" width="399" height="366" alt="birth control pills" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sc-page" /> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/ckeene" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ckeene</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 08/11/2016 - 20:40</span> <div class="field field--name-field-published-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Published</div> <div class="field__item">February 28, 2017</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Author(s)</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/author/amanda-manes" hreflang="en">Amanda Manes</a></div> </div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="flag.link_builder:build" arguments="0=node&amp;1=8066&amp;2=bookmark" token="yPFVr2TUkMu_SMgBPT4YT10Eo_wt89p0Z_6ngt_vr6k"></drupal-render-placeholder> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Reproductive justice is a framework and movement that links reproductive health and rights with social justice. The term was claimed and coined by women of color as a result of the <a href="http://www.iisd.ca/cairo.html" target="_blank">1994 International Conference on Population and Development hosted in Cairo</a>, and the reproductive justice movement emphasizes that a woman's reproductive health is not only based on individual choice but also a variety of factors and conditions within one's experiences, family, and community. While many women see abortion rights as their main issue – and it is indeed important – many women, and in particular women of color and low income women, often have difficulty accessing contraception, comprehensive sex education, sexually transmitted infection prevention and care, alternative birth options, adequate prenatal and pregnancy care, domestic violence assistance, adequate wages to support families, safe homes, and so much more. Even the right to parent is often threatened. Reproductive justice addresses all of these critical issues (Loretta J. Ross, SisterSong, 2006).</p> <p>The reproductive justice analysis also understands that women, and particularly women of color and their communities, experience reproductive oppression. Reproductive oppression is "the controlling and exploiting of women, girls, and individuals through our bodies, sexuality, labor, and reproduction (both biological and social) by families, communities, institutions and society" (<a href="http://reproductivejustice.org/assets/docs/ACRJ-A-New-Vision.pdf" target="_blank">Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice, 2005</a> and <a href="http://www.sistersong.net/publications_and_articles/Understanding_RJ.pdf" target="_blank">Loretta J. Ross</a>, <a href="http://www.sistersong.net/publications_and_articles/Understanding_RJ.pdf" target="_blank">SisterSong, 2006</a>). This reproductive oppression cannot be separated out from the other oppressions individuals and communities experience, just as a person's reproductive health experiences cannot be separated from mental, social, economic, familial, communal, or environmental well-being (<a href="http://reproductivejustice.org/assets/docs/ACRJ-A-New-Vision.pdf" target="_blank">Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice, 2005</a> and <a href="http://www.sistersong.net/publications_and_articles/Understanding_RJ.pdf" target="_blank">Loretta J. Ross, SisterSong, 2006</a>).</p> <p>This intersectional paradigm at the core of reproductive justice acknowledges that systems of oppression simultaneously discriminate based on race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, age, immigration status, language, and other factors. These intersecting forms of oppression and discrimination have historically resulted in power, privilege, and resources for a select few and limited access to power and resources for a large majority, including women of color, women in poverty, women as an overall group, and others. Reproductive justice aims to bring about the complete physical, mental, spiritual, political, social and economic well-being of women and girls, based on the full achievement and protection of not only women’s reproductive rights, but their human rights.</p> <p>This collection includes select resources that detail the history of the reproductive justice movement, provide comprehensive information on reproductive justice and social change, and lift up the work of organizations that are advancing a reproductive justice agenda. Also included are resources on the intersection of domestic and sexual violence and reproductive justice, and information on federal and state policies surrounding the issue.</p> <p>This is an update to a collection that was originally developed by the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, and the Women of Color Network. We would like to thank SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Health Collective, especially Loretta Ross, and the Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice for their years of dedication to and development of reproductive justice as a framework and movement and for all of their resources that are part of this collection.</p> </div> Fri, 12 Aug 2016 00:40:12 +0000 ckeene 8066 at https://vawnet.org Preventing and Responding to Domestic & Sexual Violence in Later Life https://vawnet.org/sc/preventing-and-responding-domestic-sexual-violence-later-life <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Preventing and Responding to Domestic &amp; Sexual Violence in Later Life</span> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-collection-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/sc_page/public/assets/images/2016-10/SCfeature-laterlife.jpg?itok=_fua71wn" width="399" height="366" alt="older woman walking on the beach" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sc-page" /> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/ckeene" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ckeene</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 08/10/2016 - 13:36</span> <div class="field field--name-field-published-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Published</div> <div class="field__item">June 01, 2016</div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="flag.link_builder:build" arguments="0=node&amp;1=7843&amp;2=bookmark" token="T6tfyCJlCOUrD_2lawFIljp8jCm_8PXr-keiP0XADwU"></drupal-render-placeholder> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>This special collection brings together selected materials related to preventing and responding to elder abuse and abuse in later life. It draws from the work of the <a href="http://www.ncall.us/" target="_blank">National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life</a> (NCALL), <a href="http://www.nsvrc.org/" target="_blank">National Sexual Violence Resource Center</a> (NSVRC), <a href="https://ncea.acl.gov/" target="_blank">National Center on Elder Abuse</a> (NCEA), <a href="http://www.napsa-now.org/" target="_blank">National Adult Protective Services Agency</a> (NAPSA) and other organizations. By focusing specifically on domestic and sexual violence (DV/SV) in later life, this special collection highlights the complexities of older people's DV/SV experiences and emphasizes collaborative and multi-pronged approaches to addressing DV/SV in later life. Accordingly, the materials included in this special collection have been organized by their relevance to key stakeholders.</p> <p>Although particular effort was made to include materials related to addressing elder abuse and abuse in later life in diverse groups of older people, very few materials in this special collection focus on elder abuse and abuse in later life within culturally diverse communities. This limitation is due to significant gaps in current literature.</p> <p><img alt="ncall.gif" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="67" src="/sites/default/files/assets/images/2016-10/ncall.gif" width="200" />This special collection was developed by the <a href="http://www.mincava.umn.edu/" target="_blank">Minnesota Center Against Violence and Abuse</a> (MINCAVA) in July 2010, revised by the <a href="http://www.ncall.us/" target="_blank">National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life</a> (NCALL) in June 2015, and updated in June 2016 by the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence in preparation for <a href="https://www.acl.gov/news-and-events/events-and-observances/world-elder-abuse-awareness-day" target="_blank">World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD)</a>, observed each year on June 15th.</p> </div> Wed, 10 Aug 2016 17:36:08 +0000 ckeene 7843 at https://vawnet.org Building Credit and Assets: Helping Survivors Recover from Economic Abuse https://vawnet.org/sc/building-credit-and-assets-helping-survivors-recover-economic-abuse <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Building Credit and Assets: Helping Survivors Recover from Economic Abuse</span> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-collection-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/sc_page/public/assets/images/2016-10/SCfeature-credit.jpg?itok=KX5xDkR5" width="399" height="366" alt="dollar bill folded into a house" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sc-page" /> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/ckeene" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ckeene</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 08/12/2016 - 08:54</span> <div class="field field--name-field-published-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Published</div> <div class="field__item">March 01, 2016</div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="flag.link_builder:build" arguments="0=node&amp;1=8091&amp;2=bookmark" token="-cH3cxAzlrj_5EAMm5qM59zBOw7Vz-ZHEh5hJ0gsgK0"></drupal-render-placeholder> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>In many cases of domestic violence, financial abuse is one of many tactics used by an abusive partner to exert power and control in the relationship. It might include controlling how money is spent, withholding money or giving an allowance, not allowing a partner to work or earn money, stealing their partner’s identity or credit, ruining their partner’s credit, depleting available assets, and more.</p> <p>Financial abuse can have an immediate impact on a survivor’s life – further isolating her, undermining her autonomy – and can also have long-term and far-reaching consequences, often trapping a survivor in poverty and interfering with her future economic stability.</p> <p>As advocates, we know that poverty increases risk and vulnerability for those living in it; and it is therefore critical that we have at least a foundational understanding of how money and finances work. For example, a low credit score equals increased risk to a potential lender and consequently, higher interest rates and costs to the borrower. This means that survivors often pay more because of bad credit, despite being among the least able to afford that. In addition, the world of credit has drastically and rapidly changed over the years, both in terms of access and use. Understanding and devoting resources to credit building and repair is critical to survivor’s long-term security.</p> <p>Additionally, access to traditional Individual Development Accounts (IDAs) and non-traditional Match Savings accounts can offer survivors the opportunity they need to jumpstart their personal asset building and begin to recover from the impacts of financial abuse. While many domestic violence programs or service providers may not have the infrastructure to actually provide these and other economic opportunities, understanding how they work is a key component of advocacy.</p> <p>One of the most exciting endeavors in the economic justice field is combining the world of micro-lending and credit building. Small no- or low-interest loans for the sole purpose of credit repair coupled with thoughtful re-payment policies is quickly and dramatically changing the economic status of many survivors and their families.</p> <p>The goal of this special collection is to help advocates better understand these important topics, how they intersect with each other, and how they can be leveraged to better support survivors.</p> <p><em>Special thanks to Kim Pentico, Director of the Economic Justice Program at the National Network to End Domestic Violence, for her assistance in framing this updated collection, and to Anna Melbin, Founder of Catalyst Consulting and Training, for originally developing the Asset Building and IDA portion of this collection in partnership with the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence.</em></p> </div> Fri, 12 Aug 2016 12:54:29 +0000 ckeene 8091 at https://vawnet.org Intimate Partner Homicide Prevention https://vawnet.org/sc/intimate-partner-homicide-prevention <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Intimate Partner Homicide Prevention</span> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-collection-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/sc_page/public/assets/images/2016-10/SCfeature-homicide.jpg?itok=8seWT79L" width="399" height="366" alt="red house among dark houses" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sc-page" /> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 07/27/2016 - 13:13</span> <div class="field field--name-field-published-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Published</div> <div class="field__item">January 01, 2016</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Author(s)</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/author/patty-branco" hreflang="en">Patty Branco</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/author/casey-keene" hreflang="en">Casey Keene</a></div> </div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="flag.link_builder:build" arguments="0=node&amp;1=7715&amp;2=bookmark" token="YC8OhUlElP7qhtmEoUM_vb9TyxO_WlzB-QZexsmOIwA"></drupal-render-placeholder> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The most tragic consequence of domestic violence is undoubtedly the death of one or both intimate partners, and in some cases, their children or family and friends of the victim. Intimate partner homicide is the final assertion of power and control in an abusive relationship and, paradoxically, an acknowledgment of the abuser’s loss of control (Websdale, 1999).</p> <p>Although intimate partner homicide has declined over the past decades (especially among male victims), the available research shows that women are more likely to be killed by an intimate partner (husband, boyfriend, same-sex partner, or ex) than by anyone else (<a href="http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/ipvav9311.pdf" target="_blank">Catalano, 2013</a>). Female murder victims are almost 6 times more likely than male murder victims to be killed by an intimate partner (<a href="http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/htus8008.pdf" target="_blank">Cooper &amp; Smith, 2011</a>). This collection offers resources to support the expansion of services and systems’ responses that are critically important to the prevention and continued decline of intimate partner homicides.</p> <p>Much is known about the risk factors that increase the danger that victim will be killed by her intimate partner. The predominant risk factor for intimate partner homicide is prior physical abuse, particularly physical assaults that have recently escalated in frequency and severity (<a href="http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/jr000250c.pdf" target="_blank">Block, 2003</a>). Other risk factors identified in the research include stalking, estrangement (physical leaving, legal separation, etc.); strangulation (choking) during an assault; threats to kill; prior use of or access to weapons, especially firearms; forced sex; controlling, possessive, jealous behavior; drug and/or alcohol abuse; and, to lesser degrees, the presence in the household of children who are not the batterer’s biological offspring; and unemployment of the batterer (<a href="http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/209732.pdf" target="_blank">Roehl, O’Sullivan, Webster, &amp; Campbell, 2005</a> &amp; <a href="http://ajph.aphapublications.org/cgi/reprint/93/7/1089.pdf" target="_blank">Campbell et al., 2003a</a>).</p> <p>Sadly, leaving an abusive relationship doesn’t necessarily end the violence, and therefore leaving isn’t always the safest choice for victims. In fact, “the extant research literature shows that women experience an increased risk of lethal violence when they leave intimate relationships with men” (Websdale, 1999). It is essential that helping professionals become familiar with lethality risk factors so that they can best minimize these risks and support the informed choices of domestic violence survivors.</p> <p><b>This collection provides:</b></p> <ul><li>national and statewide homicide statistics that help illustrate the scope of the problem;</li> <li>an overview of tools and strategies for assessing danger or the risk of lethality in domestic violence cases;</li> <li>recommendations and approaches for utilizing the fatality review process to prevent intimate partner homicide;</li> <li>materials describing various systems’ responses to domestic violence and efforts to prevent homicide;</li> <li>resources to assist advocates in helping to frame the issue through media response and community mobilization; and</li> <li>resources addressing the grief and trauma experienced by loved ones of those whose lives are lost to domestic violence.</li> </ul><p>This resource was developed by the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence. Special thanks to the <a href="http://www.bwjp.org/" target="_blank">Battered Women's Justice Project</a>, <a href="http://www.wscadv.org/" target="_blank">Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence</a>, <a href="http://www.fcadv.org/" target="_blank">Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence</a>, and <a href="http://www.pcadv.org/" target="_blank">Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence</a> for their contributions. </p> </div> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 17:13:44 +0000 admin 7715 at https://vawnet.org Navigating the Civil Legal System: Resources for Survivors of Domestic Violence, Their Advocates, and Legal Professionals https://vawnet.org/sc/navigating-civil-legal-system-resources-survivors-domestic-violence-their-advocates-and-legal <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Navigating the Civil Legal System: Resources for Survivors of Domestic Violence, Their Advocates, and Legal Professionals</span> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-collection-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/sc_page/public/assets/images/2016-10/SCfeature-legal.jpg?itok=lHbdalVX" width="399" height="366" alt="lady justice" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sc-page" /> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/ckeene" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ckeene</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 08/12/2016 - 13:56</span> <div class="field field--name-field-published-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Published</div> <div class="field__item">December 01, 2015</div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="flag.link_builder:build" arguments="0=node&amp;1=8116&amp;2=bookmark" token="fXaOLnjVC3H351N_RKdxDNAfTYusspdwoCQtV_sQWpM"></drupal-render-placeholder> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Survivors of domestic violence can face a number of legal issues that either directly stem from, or are affected by, the actions of those who use abuse and violence. These issues can include obtaining protection orders against an abuser; filing for divorce; seeking custody of and/or visitation with minor children; and filing for child support. This collection of resources is divided, in part, by these topics and is specifically focused on those legal issues most commonly arising in family court.<br /><br /><strong>Please note that the focus of this resource collection is civil legal issues rather than criminal legal matters.*</strong> The collection includes both national and state legal resources for advocates and legal professionals working with survivors of domestic violence, as well as survivors who either may be representing themselves in protection order and family law proceedings or who are seeking legal referrals. In addition, this collection includes a number of directories to assist in locating legal services for survivors in specific states, including legal aid organizations, paid attorneys, and volunteer attorneys, as well as information on how state laws and court procedures differ.</p> <p>While many survivors of domestic violence choose to pursue legal remedies to address abuse and related issues, and there are often positive benefits associated with obtaining legal help, there are many survivors who wish to avoid the legal system for a number of reasons and instead pursue other avenues of support. Listed below are just a few of the considerations that might be important to individual survivors:</p> <ul><li>Legal representation is expensive, and there are often associated and sometimes unanticipated costs.</li> <li>Though evidence suggests economic benefits to society associated with providing legal services to domestic violence survivors, and that the benefits to be gained by subsidizing more legal services can often justify their costs, low- or no-cost legal representation is not always guaranteed (<a href="http://policyintegrity.org/documents/SupportingSurvivors.pdf" target="_blank">Supporting Survivors: The Economic Benefits of Providing Civil Legal Assistance to Survivors of Domestic Violence, 2015</a>).</li> <li>Pursuing legal remedies requires a great deal of time for case preparation, meetings with attorneys, and court hearings, thereby adding another layer of challenges to a survivor’s life.</li> <li>It can prove intimidating, and even dangerous, to bring a legal action against or face an abuser in court.</li> <li>Life-changing decisions such as custody of minor children are often ultimately left to the determination of a judge; the potential exists for a decision to be made that might not be ideal, or even favorable, to the survivor or her children.</li> <li>Significantly, many survivors may face discrimination from the legal system itself, particularly survivors of color, LGBT survivors, survivors with disabilities, and survivors with limited English proficiency.</li> <li>Because of laws regarding tribal and state jurisdiction, Native survivors may not even be able to access appropriate and necessary legal remedies.</li> </ul><p>Such barriers and discrimination may substantially, and understandably, dissuade survivors from engaging with the civil legal system.</p> <p>Survivors are strongly encouraged to seek advice and support from a domestic violence advocate or other trusted source before pursuing legal action against an abusive partner. Also, in the event a survivor decides not to pursue legal action, there are a number of alternative types of support available to her/him. For more information on the specific types of support that exist for survivors, please contact your state domestic violence coalition.<br />  <br /> Please note that there are a number of legal issues that can and often do intersect with domestic violence, including housing, economics and finance, immigration, and criminal legal issues. This collection does not cover those topics. While some of the material included here addresses immigration status as it relates to other legal issues in immigrant survivors’ lives, information on representing survivors in immigration proceedings is outside of the scope of this resource collection. For more information on the myriad issues affecting immigrant survivors of domestic violence, please access the VAWnet Special Collection, Immigrant Women and Domestic Violence.</p> <p><strong>Please note that the resources found below are for informational purposes only and do not contain legal advice.</strong></p> <hr /><p>* For more information on the intersection of criminal legal matters and domestic violence, please visit <a href="http://www.bwjp.org/about-bwjp.html">the Battered Women’s Justice Project.</a></p> </div> Fri, 12 Aug 2016 17:56:45 +0000 ckeene 8116 at https://vawnet.org The Intersections Between Intimate Partner Violence and HIV/AIDS https://vawnet.org/sc/intersections-between-intimate-partner-violence-and-hivaids <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">The Intersections Between Intimate Partner Violence and HIV/AIDS</span> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-collection-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/sc_page/public/assets/images/2016-10/SCfeature-HIV.jpg?itok=moWEEWRD" width="399" height="366" alt="heart of red blood cells" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sc-page" /> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/ckeene" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ckeene</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 08/10/2016 - 14:24</span> <div class="field field--name-field-published-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Published</div> <div class="field__item">September 01, 2015</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Author(s)</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/author/alicia-gill" hreflang="en">Alicia Gill</a></div> </div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="flag.link_builder:build" arguments="0=node&amp;1=7864&amp;2=bookmark" token="Wjpk6g0I96SsrJu35M3x2kjySW6pGp0SsnUhjka_13c"></drupal-render-placeholder> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Intimate partner violence and HIV/AIDS have devastating impacts on individuals and communities at large. They also have strong correlations, putting survivors of domestic violence at increased risk for contracting HIV/AIDS. According to the <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/ipv/13_243567_green_aag-a.pdf" target="_blank">Centers for Disease Control and Prevention</a>, women experiencing intimate partner violence have four times the risk of contracting STIs including HIV, than women not experiencing domestic violence. Studies suggest that intimate partner violence can be both a risk factor for HIV, and a consequence of HIV (<a href="http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/ipv/13_243567_green_aag-a.pdf" target="_blank">Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, 2014</a>). Despite a broader understanding of HIV/AIDS, increased research, and greater access to prevention services, the proportion of AIDS diagnoses reported among women has more than tripled since 1985. Persistent gender inequality, ableism, gender based violence and homophobia create barriers for women, people with disabilities and LGBTQ individuals in preventing HIV and receiving care after a diagnosis.</p> <p>Additionally, due to social, cultural and economic factors, women of color, and specifically Black/African-American women, bear the burden of both HIV and intimate partner violence. <img alt="HIV-1.png" height="213" src="/sites/default/files/assets/images/2016-10/HIV-1.png" style="float:right" width="348" />African American women constituted 64% of all women diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in 2010 and are 14 times more likely to die from AIDS-related complications than white women with HIV/AIDS (<a href="http://www.amfar.org/uploadedFiles/_amfarorg/Articles/On_The_Hill/2015/IB_Women-HIV_UnitedStates_2015-03-19_FINAL.pdf" target="_blank">AmFAR, 2015</a>). African-American women have an HIV prevalence rate nearly four times that of white women in the United States. African American females also experience intimate partner violence at a rate 35% higher than that of white females, and about 2.5 times the rate of women of other races (<a href="http://www.doj.state.or.us/victims/pdf/women_of_color_network_facts_domestic_violence_2006.pdf" target="_blank">US Department of Justice, 2001</a>).</p> <p>At the intersection of HIV/AIDS and intimate partner violence is sexual violence. Abusers commonly use sexual abuse and coercion to control the sexual, physical and reproductive rights of their partners. This increases the risk of HIV through forced sex, restricting access to condoms, and denying victims access to healthcare.</p> <p><strong>This Special Collection is designed to assist domestic violence advocates in providing support and resources to victims of domestic violence who are also living with HIV/AIDS or at risk of contracting HIV due to violence in the context of their relationship. This collection contains resources to help advocates and service providers understand HIV/AIDS and its connection to intimate partner violence, and provides resources to help expand program capacity to serve victims living with HIV/AIDS.</strong></p> <p><em>This collection may use the term victim and survivor interchangeably to talk about a person who is experiencing or has experienced intimate partner violence. We recognize different communities and individuals may identify with one term over another, or some other term altogether. Additionally, this collection may use the terms domestic violence and intimate partner violence interchangeably to refer to violence happening within the context of a current or past intimate or romantic relationship.</em></p> <p>This collection uses resources freely available on the Internet, citing and utilizing work and tools from many different partners, agencies, and government entities. Our hope is that this collection creates a simplified, one-stop compilation of the newest and most relevant information available on the subject. We intend to update this special collection regularly and add new documents, resources and information as it becomes available. We welcome your comments, suggestions, and information about documents for this special collection.</p> <p>Special thanks to Alicia Gill for her work on this collection, and to our partners who provided input to the content: <a href="http://www.futureswithoutviolence.org/health/" target="_blank">National Health Resource Center on Domestic Violence</a>, <a href="http://nnedv.org/" target="_blank">National Network to End Domestic Violence</a>, <a href="http://www.virginiaavp.org/" target="_blank">Virginia Anti-Violence Project</a>, <a href="http://www.fanfreeclinic.org/" target="_blank">Fan Free Clinic</a>, and <a href="http://www.jhsph.edu/" target="_blank">Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health</a>.</p> </div> Wed, 10 Aug 2016 18:24:19 +0000 ckeene 7864 at https://vawnet.org Traumatic Brain Injury and Domestic Violence: Understanding the Intersections https://vawnet.org/sc/traumatic-brain-injury-and-domestic-violence-understanding-intersections <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Traumatic Brain Injury and Domestic Violence: Understanding the Intersections</span> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-collection-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/sc_page/public/assets/images/2016-10/SCfeature-TBI.jpg?itok=J6A58p7N" width="399" height="366" alt="painting of woman&#039;s profile with chaos in head" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sc-page" /> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/ckeene" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ckeene</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 08/11/2016 - 18:46</span> <div class="field field--name-field-published-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Published</div> <div class="field__item">June 01, 2014</div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="flag.link_builder:build" arguments="0=node&amp;1=8007&amp;2=bookmark" token="gSMsY51k3ZasqkbHKIz_R4MicF-GLez22ITPl3PTppM"></drupal-render-placeholder> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a specific type of damage to the brain that is caused by external physical force and is not present at birth or degenerative. A blow (or blows) to the head, shaking of the brain, loss of oxygen (anoxia), colliding with a stationary object and exposure to blasts can cause a TBI. Based on this definition, the use of physical force by an intimate partner during incidents of domestic violence can cause traumatic brain injury as abusive partners often cause injury to a victim’s head, neck (including strangulation), and face. In one study, 30% of domestic violence survivors reported a loss of consciousness at least once and 67% reported residual problems that were potentially head-injury related (<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12748454" target="_blank">Corrigan, Wolfe, Mysiw, Jackson &amp; Bogner, 2003</a>).</p> <p>However, TBI often goes undiagnosed amongst domestic violence survivors. One reason for this is that domestic violence survivors, who also have a TBI, may exhibit symptoms that could resemble those of a mental illness, such as depression, anxiety, tension and/or inability to adapt to changing situations. Additionally, DV/TBI survivors may appear to have behavioral issues, including problems with keeping appointments, following through, or completing tasks that require multiple steps.</p> <p>Anecdotal information from survivors and advocates indicates that victims with TBI are often questioned in regards to their ability to parent. At a training for domestic violence advocates, a TBI survivor as a result of domestic violence shared how she would forget to pick up her daughter from school, which prompted a call to the Child Protective Services agency in her area. Others have talked about the difficulties they experienced while living in congregate settings where following rules was, at times, problematic. These kinds of behaviors are often not intentional and survivors may even appear to be uncooperative and oppositional. However, it is important to keep in mind that many of these perceived behaviors might be directly related to the TBI. Therefore, it is crucial for domestic violence service providers and health care professionals to understand the prevalence and effects of TBI within the context of domestic violence.</p> <p>This Special Collection offers information about the intersection between domestic violence and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). It provides advocates and other professionals with tools to screen for TBI within the context of domestic violence as well as presentations, articles, and other relevant resources on the topic.</p> <p>The purpose of this collection is to: 1) increase knowledge and understanding of TBI within the context of domestic violence, 2) provide tools to advocates and other professionals to screen domestic violence survivors for TBI, and 3) highlight best practices.</p> <p>The NRCDV provides a wide range of free, comprehensive, and individualized technical assistance, training, and specialized resource materials and projects designed to enhance current intervention and prevention strategies. To suggest additional resources we should include in this collection or for ongoing technical assistance and other resources, please contact the NRCDV Technical Assistance Team.</p> </div> Thu, 11 Aug 2016 22:46:03 +0000 ckeene 8007 at https://vawnet.org Open Doors: Domestic Violence Shelter Development https://vawnet.org/sc/open-doors-domestic-violence-shelter-development <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Open Doors: Domestic Violence Shelter Development</span> <div class="field field--name-field-featured-collection-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/sc_page/public/assets/images/2016-10/SCfeature-opendoors.jpg?itok=GUgzRZmC" width="399" height="366" alt="3 open doors" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sc-page" /> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/ckeene" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ckeene</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 08/11/2016 - 09:05</span> <div class="field field--name-field-published-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Published</div> <div class="field__item">March 01, 2014</div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="flag.link_builder:build" arguments="0=node&amp;1=7912&amp;2=bookmark" token="XzVu67381mWf-nfrR7rwMJZZpBkuINXAsdSGy_5hwgo"></drupal-render-placeholder> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The NRCDV receives a large number of technical assistance requests related to domestic violence program development. Part 1 provides resources for building, sustaining and enhancing shelter programs to meet the diverse needs of domestic violence survivors.</p> <p>This is PART 1 of a 2-part collection, which also includes <strong>Thinking Beyond Shelter (Or Alternative Ways to Help Survivors) </strong>(PART 2 of 2). PART 1 provides resources for building, sustaining, and enhancing shelter programs to meet the diverse needs of domestic violence survivors.</p> </div> Thu, 11 Aug 2016 13:05:55 +0000 ckeene 7912 at https://vawnet.org