Survivors of intimate violence seek help online: Implications of responding to increasing requests.

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As background information, the article cites statistics on both U.S. women's use of the world wide web and U.S. rates of women's victimization to then extrapolate estimates of the possible number of survivors online. The article also provides brief information about what 'direct services' organizations presently offer online.

It explores some of the implications around responding to requests from survivors online and discusses VAWOR's experiences with the increasing number of electronic help-seeking requests. VAWOR received 427 email requests between October 1, 1999 and September 30, 2000; 153 (35.8%) of which were sent by self-identified survivors of intimate violence.

Concluding that the Internet is an important tool for reaching survivors of intimate violence, the author calls for a national discussion on responding to such requests and underscores the importance of developing a strategic plan to address safety, confidentiality, and liability concerns of providing online advocacy to survivors of intimate violence.