Home / Special Collections / Preventing and Responding to Teen Dating Violence

Special Collection: Preventing and Responding to Teen Dating Violence

Table of Contents:


Introduction | Back to top

This special collection emphasizes collaborative and multi-level approaches to the prevention of and response to teen dating violence (TDV). It draws on the work of many organizations and organizes the resources on TDV prevention and responses by different populations. The first section of this special collection provides general information about teen dating violence. The next six sections include TDV information related to: 1) young people, 2) parents and care takers, 3) men and boys, 4) teachers and school-based professionals, 5) health care professionals, and 6) domestic violence and sexual violence service providers. The final section presents documents on TDV-related laws and legislation. The special collection concludes with examples of national programs that address TDV and a list of national and statewide organizations and programs.

This special collection is limited in that it only includes documents that are freely available online. While most materials in this collection focus on TDV prevention and response to young people in high schools, we acknowledge that TDV prevention also includes outreach to younger teens in middle schools and older college students, as well as youth who are not represented in our system of education (runaways, homeless youth, etc.). This special collection will be updated regularly, and new documents will be added as they become available. We welcome your comments, suggestions, and information about documents for this special collection. Please submit your comments via VAWnet's online contact form.

Teen Dating Violence: The Epidemic | Back to top

Broadly defined as a pattern of abuse or threat of abuse against teenaged dating partners, TDV occurs across diverse groups and cultures. Although the dynamics of TDV are similar to adult domestic violence, the forms and experience of TDV as well as the challenges in seeking and providing services make the problem of TDV unique. TDV occurs in different forms, including verbal, emotional, physical, sexual, and digital, and the experience of TDV may have both immediate and long term effects on young people. The documents included in this section highlight the widespread problem of TDV, the different types of dating abuse, and their impacts on young people. These documents draw from various studies that use different measures. Therefore, data presented in these documents vary.

*See also Teen Dating Violence Information and Resources by the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence for information about the dynamics, prevalence, and consequences of TDV.

  • The Facts on Tweens and Teens and Dating Violence | PDF PDF (3 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence
    This fact sheet presents data from various studies to show the prevalence of teen dating violence among tweens and teens.
    + View Summary
  • 2011 College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll | PDF PDF HTML HTML
    by Knowledge Networks for Liz Claiborne Inc. (June 2011)
    This survey with 508 college students including 330 women and 178 men reveals that a significant number of college women (43%) are victims of dating violence. The results also show that college students generally do not know how to help their friends (58%), or themselves (38%), get out of abusive relationships.
    + View Summary
  • Understanding Teen Dating Violence Fact Sheet | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by Centers for Disease Control (2012)
    This fact sheet notes three types of dating abuses – physical, emotional, and sexual – and draws on research to show that teen dating violence is a public health problem. The fact sheet also presents CDC’s approach to teen dating violence prevention.
    + View Summary
  • Interpersonal and Physical Dating Violence among Teens | PDF PDF (8 p.)
    by Antoinette Davis, National Council on Crime and Delinquency (September 2008)
    This document examines the prevalence of dating violence by gender and communities of color. The document also presents information about the different types of dating violence and their effects on teens who experience dating violence.
    + View Summary
  • Dating Violence Among Adolescents | PDF PDF (3 p.) HTML HTML (3 p.)
    by Smita Varia, Advocates for Youth (November 2006)
    This document presents information about dating violence, the types of dating abuse, its effect, and prevalence of dating violence in both heterosexual and GLBT relationships. The document also presents suggestions for dating violence prevention programs.
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  • Teen Dating Violence: A Closer Look at Adolescent Romantic Relationships | PDF PDF (7 p.) HTML HTML (7 p.)
    by Carrie Mulford and Peggy Giordano, National Institute of Justice (2008)
    This document presents a gender analysis of teen dating violence. The author examines physical aggression by girls and boys. The authors describe the differences between adult intimate partner violence and teen dating violence.
    + View Summary
  • The Connection between Dating Violence and Unhealthy Behaviors | PDF PDF (5 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence
    This fact sheet presents data from various studies to show the connection between dating violence and unhealthy behaviors. Information on risks associated with witnessing violence as well as mitigating factors is also included.
    + View Summary
  • Forced Sexual Intercourse Among Young Adult Women | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by Emily Holcombe, Jennifer Manlove, and Erum Ikramullah, Child Trends (August 2008)
    This fact sheet uses nationally representative data to show that forced sexual intercourse is a common experience among young adult women of all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. Data on forced intercourse and risky behaviors is also presented.
    + View Summary
  • Dating Violence in Communities of Color | PDF PDF (12 p.)
    by Women of Color Network, National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (NRCDV) (2008)
    This "Facts & Stats Collection" paper describes specific issues and distinguishing dynamics that confront teens and young adults of color, highlighting types of abuse and warning signs. Resources for additional information are provided.
    + View Summary
  • Teen Dating Violence among Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgendered Girls | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by Gunner Gurwitch, The Network/La Red
    Describes comparisons to violence in heterosexual relationships, discusses additional tactics of power and control that may be used by abusers, highlights barriers often faced by LBT teens, and suggests ways to create a welcoming and affirming response.
    + View Summary
  • LGBTQ Abusive Relationships | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by Break the Cycle
    This fact sheet presents information dating and domestic violence among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and queer (LGBTQ) young people and the obstacles faced by LGBTQ youth in seeking help.
    + View Summary
  • Transgender Youth and Dating Violence | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by Break the Cycle (2008)
    This fact sheet explains what being transgender means, how transgender youth may experience TDV differently. The factsheet also discusses barriers transgender youth face in seeking help.
    + View Summary
  • Runaway and Homeless Youth and Relationship Violence Toolkit | HTML HTML
    by the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, in collaboration with the Family Violence Prevention and Services Program of HHS (February 2010)
    This toolkit was developed by and for advocates in the runaway and homeless youth and dv/sa fields to help programs create partnerships, meaningful services, and effective intervention and prevention strategies for working with youth at risk.
    + View Summary

Young People | Back to top

Young people may be survivors or perpetrators of dating violence, or they may have friends who are in abusive dating relationships. Engaging young people is key to promoting healthy dating relationships. This involves promoting values of healthy relationships, increasing awareness of dating violence, developing skills necessary to maintain safety, providing information about services available, and creating an environment where young people can reach out for help. The documents in this section are targeted specifically to young people and provide information about healthy relationships, dating violence and how to identify it, safety planning, and seeking help for abuse or for friends who are in abusive dating relationships.

* See also VAWnet's Special Collection: Working with Children Towards a Healthy & Non-Violent Future, providing a unique perspective on working with children younger than 13 years of age.

Promoting Healthy Relationships
  • The Relationship Spectrum | HTML HTML
    by loveisrespect.org (January 2013)
    All relationships live on a range, somewhere between healthy, unhealthy and abusive. This interactive Relationship Spectrum helps teens and young adults determine how parts of their relationship rank on the scale.
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  • Thirteen Ways Any HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT Can Make Ending Domestic Violence His or Her Business | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by the Domestic Violence Awareness Project of the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (2012)
    This document describes ways in which any high school student can help ending domestic violence.
    + View Summary
  • Relationship Quizzes | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by loveisrespect.org (2011)
    This webpage has multiple interactive quizzes that teens can take to learn about their own relationships, a friend's relationship, or to test their knowledge on dating violence. Click on the "Relationship Quizzes" tab to access them.
    + View Summary
  • What You Need to Know About Dating Violence. A Teen’s Handbook | PDF PDF (28 p.)
    by Liz Claiborne Inc. (2000)
    This handbook offers guidance to teen girls and boys about recognizing dating violence in their relationships and seeking help for it. It also includes suggestions on helping friends who are in abusive relationships.
    + View Summary
  • Teen Tools: Help for Teenage Victims of Crime | PDF PDF (36 p.)
    by Teen Victim Project, National Center for Victims of Crime
    This teen tool factsheet provides information to young people about the various types of dating abuse and how to receive or provide help to young people who are in abusive relationships.
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  • Healthy LGBTQ Relationships | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by loveisrespect.org
    This handout provides information to help LGBTQ youth identify the signs of an unhealthy relationship. It also includes brief information on where they can seek help.
    + View Summary
  • Did You Know Your Relationship Affects Your Health? | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence
    This poster presents information about sexual abuse and coercion in relationships and suggests women who experience sexual violence to talk to their healthcare providers and national hotlines.
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  • The Relationship Spectrum | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by Adolescent Health Working Group (2010)
    The Relationship Spectrum helps youth identify the warning signs of abuse and learn when a behavior crosses the line from healthy to unhealthy or even abusive.
    + View Summary
  • Drug Facilitated Sexual Assault | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by RAINN
    This webpage provides information about substances being used by perpetrators to compromise an individual's ability to consent to sexual activity. Safety tips for safe drinking are included.
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  • Help A Friend | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by loveisrespect.org
    This information sheet provides tips to young people to help their peers who experience relationship violence.
    + View Summary
  • Help a Stranger | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by loveisrespect.org
    This document provides suggestions on how to help someone who is experiencing dating abuse.
    + View Summary
  • Dater's Bill of Rights | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by National Crime Prevention Council
    This one-page document lists individual rights within a dating relationship.
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Safety Planning
  • Interactive Guide to Safety Planning | HTML HTML
    by loveisrespect.org (December 2012)
    Safety plans look different for different types of abuse and different people. This interactive feature can help teens and young adults customize their very own safety plan to fit their specific situations.
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  • Create a Teen Safety Plan | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence
    This handout assures teens who experience abuse that abuse is not their fault and provides guidance to young people on developing a safety plan and seeking support.
    + View Summary
  • Creating a Safety Plan | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by Break the Cycle (Updated July 2008)
    This brochure offers safety planning tips for teens in abusive relationships including questions to consider when planning for safety and how to find help in your local area.
    + View Summary
  • A Teen’s Safety Plan | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by Amy Hill, Break the Cycle
    This resource includes a sample written safety plan and detailed safety planning tips for teens who are in abusive relationships.
    + View Summary
  • LGBTQ Relationships and the Law | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by loveisrespect.org
    The legal system is an important tool in your safety planning, whether you’re straight or LGBTQ. This short handout provides safety tips for LGBTQ youth for seeking legal assistance and protection.
    + View Summary

Parents & Caregivers | Back to top

Parents and caregivers play a critical role in preventing and responding to dating violence. Parents and caregivers can inculcate values that promote healthy dating relationships as well as observe signs of dating abuse or perpetration, and seek appropriate help for their children. The documents included in this section provide information to parents and caregivers on helping their children build healthy relationships, identifying if their children are experiencing or perpetrating dating abuse, initiating conversations about dating violence with their children, helping their children navigate dangerous relationships, and learning more about the dynamics of TDV.

The Parents Corner of the RESPECT! campaign offers information and tools for talking to kids about healthy relationships, guidelines on how to navigate their digital world, and how to talk to kids about being an upstander vs. a bystander when it comes to bullying.
  • Start Talking: Questions You Might Encounter | PDF PDF (3 p.)
    by Love is Respect and Blue Cross/Blue Shield (2013)
    This handout offers answers to tough questions that youth often ask when learning about dating violence. These questions and answers give adults an opportunity to prepare for conversations with teens and to give real answers to teens’ difficult questions. This handout can be shared with parents, teachers, and other adults working with youth.
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  • A Parent's Handbook: How to Talk to Your Children About Developing Healthy Relationships | PDF PDF (7 p.)
    by Richard Gallagher, Liz Claiborne Women's Work
    Designed for parents of pre-teens, this booklet was developed as a tool to help parents lay the foundation for healthy decision-making patterns and relationships. Includes tips for "starting the dialogue," interactive quiz, and additional resources.
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  • A Parent’s Guide to Teen Dating Violence: 10 Questions to Start the Conversation | PDF PDF (8 p.)
    by Liz Claiborne, Inc (2000)
    This guide provides suggestions to parents and guardians on how they can initiate a conversation with their teens about dating, dating violence, and healthy relationships.
    + View Summary
  • Parents Guide to Teen Dating Violence | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by Crime and Violence Prevention Center
    This brochure provides suggestions to parents on identifying teen dating violence, things to keep in mind when talking to teens who have been abused, and things to not say or do.
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Hosted by Break the Cycle’s Love Is Not Abuse Campaign, It’s Time To Talk Day is an annual awareness day that aims to generate conversations about healthy relationships and prevent teen dating violence and abuse.

  • Talk about it… Tips for adults talking to youth about consent | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by the Vermont Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence
    This handout offers tips for adults on how to talk to youth about sexual consent.
    + View Summary
  • Whose Kids? Our Kids! Teens, Sex, and Sexual Victimization | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by Mary Huser, Donna Doll-Yogerst, Karen Hintz, and Stephen Small, Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System (1999)
    This document highlights the importance of parental monitoring to protect their children from becoming victims of sexual abuse. It provides guidance to parents to monitor their children’s activities and companions without being intrusive.
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  • Help Your Child | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by loveisrespect.org
    Parents are in a critical position to help their children develop healthy relationships and to provide life saving support if their children are in an abusive relationship. This handout offers helpful tips about what parents need to know and how they can be of help.
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  • Start Relating Before They Start Dating: A Workshop For Parents and Caregivers, and their Teens | PDF PDF (73 p.)
    by Start Strong Idaho (2013)
    This is a 2.5-hour family dinner model where youth and parents separately learn about dating abuse and strategies for improving parent/caregiver-youth communication, including communication about dating abuse. Youth and parents then share a meal and practice communication skills. Targeted to parents and youth in middle school, it can be adapted for older audiences.
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  • Moving from a Relationship Bystander to a Relationship Upstander Workshop Guide | PDF PDF (16 p.)
    by Start Strong Boston, Boston Public Health Commission and Futures Without Violence
    This guide is geared toward parents of middle school youth but is also appropriate for parents of older teens. The goal of the 80-minute workshop is to help parents and caregivers encourage youth to respond to dating violence and promote non-violent relationships among their peers.
    + View Summary

Men & Boys | Back to top

This section emphasizes the importance of engaging men and young boys in the prevention of TDV. The documents included here provide guidance on working with young men to develop values for healthy relationships, change gender stereotypes, and prevent TDV and other forms of violence against women.

* See also VAWnet's Special Collection: Men and Boys: Preventing Sexual and Intimate Partner Violence.

  • Toolkit for Working with Men and Boys to Prevent Gender-Based Violence | HTML HTML
    by Futures Without Violence (2007)
    This web site is a comprehensive tool kit designed to help you work with men and boys to prevent gender-based violence.
    + View Summary
  • Tough Talk: What boys need to know about relationship abuse | PDF PDF (12 p.)
    by Liz Claiborne Inc.
    Created to help men start a conversation with the boys in their lives about developing and maintaining positive relationships, this booklet defines abuse, provides practical guidelines and tips for starting a dialogue, and lists additional resources.
    + View Summary
  • The Coaching Boys into Men Playbook | PDF PDF (26 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence (2008)
    This tool helps coaches deliver a critical message to young men: Help end violence against women by treating everyone with the same honor and respect that they give their teammates. Includes information and strategies for promoting this positive message.
    + View Summary
  • Young Men as Allies in Preventing Violence and Abuse: Building Effective Partnerships with Schools | PDF PDF (13 p.)
    by Alan Berkowitz, Peter Jaffe, Dean Peacock, Barri Rosenbluth & Carole Sousa, Futures Without Violence (2003)
    The focus of this paper is on the ways schools can play a critical role in involving young men in 'constructing a healthier world for women and men, a world free of violence and founded on principles of equity and compassion.'
    + View Summary
  • Making the Peace: An Approach to Preventing Relationship Violence Among Youth | PDF PDF (81 p.)
    by Allan Creighton, TODOS Institute/Oakland Men's Project, National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (May 2000)
    Describes a comprehensive school-based project that provided training and technical assistance to 2 communities implementing comprehensive dating/domestic violence prevention campaigns in their secondary schools.
    + View Summary
  • Working with Young Men Who Batter | PDF PDF (12 p.) HTML HTML
    by Dean Peacock and Emily Rothman, VAWnet: The National Online Resource Center on Violence Against Women (November 2001)
    This document reviews juvenile BIPs, identifies risk factors for teen dating violence perpetration, describes efforts to prevent re-offenses, discusses shortcomings inherent in post-crisis intervention, and outlines current challenges within the field.
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  • Work through Schools | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence (2003)
    This toolkit offers guidance on school-based violence prevention programs for boys.
    + View Summary

Teachers & School-based Professionals | Back to top

Teachers and school-based professionals have opportunities to prevent dating violence by increasing awareness of dating violence, promoting practices of healthy relationships, and creating an environment where young people can seek help for dating abuse. This section includes documents that provide guidance to teachers to assess signs of dating violence among teens, as well as information about services that teachers can direct young people to and curricula for school-based teen dating violence prevention.

Help spread the word about healthy relationships! Download posters, handouts, palm cards and other free educational materials from loveisrespect.org and share them widely.

Policies and Best Practices
  • Vision for Healthy Relationships Education | PDF PDF (3 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence
    This document identifies some core components that provide the basis for effective healthy relationships education.
    + View Summary
  • Love What’s Real Guide | PDF PDF (7 p.)
    by the Center for Healthy Teen Relationships, a project of the Idaho Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence
    This guide for National Teen Dating Violence Awareness & Prevention Month highlights simple steps that schools can take to help ending dating violence.
    + View Summary
  • School And District Policies To Increase Student Safety And Improve School Climate: Promoting Healthy Relationships And Preventing Teen Dating Violence | PDF PDF (61 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence and Break the Cycle
    This policy toolkit was designed to support schools looking to foster a culture of healthy relationships and prevent teen dating violence. The toolkit offers best practices around the prevention of dating violence, as well as guidelines for early intervention and crisis response.
    + View Summary
  • Beyond Title IX: Guidelines for Preventing and Responding to Gender-based Violence in Higher Education | PDF PDF (62 p.)
    by Ann Fleck-Henderson with contributions from Peggy Costello, Maya Raghu, Jennifer Solidum Rose and Diane Rosenfeld for Futures Without Violence and the Avon Foundation (2012)
    This report presents guidelines on incorporating effective gender-based violence prevention and response for colleges, universities, and other institutions of higher education.
    + View Summary
  • Shifting Boundaries: Final Report on an Experimental Evaluation of a Youth Dating Violence Prevention Program in New York City Middle Schools | PDF PDF (322 p.)
    by Bruce Taylor, Nan D. Stein, Dan Woods, and Elizabeth Mumford for the US Department of Justice (2011)
    The purpose of this study was to provide high‐quality scientific evidence concerning the effectiveness of targeting a young, universal primary prevention audience with classroom‐based curricula and school‐level interventions.
    + View Summary
  • Expect Respect Program Overview: A School-Based Program for Preventing Teen Dating Violence and Promoting Safe and Healthy Relationships | PDF PDF (32 p.)
    by Barbara Ball and Barri Rosenbluth, SafePlace (2008)
    This document reviews this nationally recognized, school-based program for preventing teen dating violence and promoting safe and healthy relationships in middle and high school.
    + View Summary


This video was created by the Expect Respect leadership team at Propel Braddock
Hills High School to share some information about teen dating violence.

  • Lessons from Literature | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence and the National Council of Teachers of English (2009)
    This website provides free resources to help teachers incorporate violence prevention lessons into existing curricula.
    + View Summary
  • A Guide to Addressing Teen Dating and Sexual Assault in a School Setting | PDF PDF (22 p.)
    by Peace Over Violence with assistance from the California Women's Law Center, Crime and Violence Prevention Center, California Attorney General's Office (February 2008)
    This guide details schools' responsibility to take a leadership role to prevent and respond to teen dating and sexual violence in schools and in the community. While the information is specific to California, much can be applied nationally.
    + View Summary
  • Relationship Abuse Prevention Program (RAPP) | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by Center Against Domestic Violence, Office of Domestic Violence and Emergency Intervention Services, Department of Social Services of the Human Resources Administration, City of New York (2005)
    This school-based domestic violence prevention curriculum teaches students to recognize and prevent teen relationship abuse. Lesson plans include a variety of exercises. Parent workshop information and school staff development materials are also included.
    + View Summary
  • Making the Peace: An Approach to Preventing Relationship Violence Among Youth | PDF PDF (81 p.)
    by Allan Creighton, TODOS Institute/Oakland Men's Project, National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (May 2000)
    Describes a comprehensive school-based project that provided training and technical assistance to 2 communities implementing comprehensive dating/domestic violence prevention campaigns in their secondary schools.
    + View Summary
  • Organizing College Campuses Against Dating Abuse | PDF PDF (68 p.)
    by Marilyn Best and Debbie Nelson, National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (1999)
    This publication provides information and assistance to staff in higher education and/or domestic violence programs who are interested in developing a comprehensive response to dating abuse as it affects students on college campuses.
    + View Summary
Lesson Plans and Curricula
  • DV 101 Single Day Lesson Plan | PDF PDF (11 p.)
    by Break the Cycle
    This lesson addresses dating violence by using a series of videos (available on YouTube) as the basis for group discussion about different forms of abuse. It provides participants with strategies for safely ending a relationship and for seeking resources for themselves or friends.
    + View Summary
  • Youth and Child Advocate and Educator Manual of Activities and Exercises for Children and Youth | PDF PDF (235 p.)
    by the Vermont Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence (Revised July 2013)
    This manual provides a listing of activities and exercises designed to be used by advocates and educators working with children and youth to prevent violence and foster healthy relationships.
    + View Summary
  • Love Is Not Abuse Curriculum: College Edition | PDF PDF (71 p.)
    by Liz Claiborne Inc. (December 2010)
    This curriculum educates college students about the dangers and warning signs of dating violence, offers lessons specifically on abuse via technology and provides resources where students can find help on campus.
    + View Summary
  • Love is Not Abuse Curriculum: High School Edition | PDF PDF (80 p.)
    by Liz Claiborne Inc. (2008)
    The curriculum aims to increase high school students' understanding of teen dating violence, help students challenge misconceptions that "support" dating violence, and increase help seeking behaviors among students involved in abusive relationships.
    + View Summary
  • Dating Matters: Understanding Teen Dating Violence Prevention | HTML HTML
    by the Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2010)
    This free, online VetoViolence course provides educators with a basic knowledge of teen dating violence prevention.
    + View Summary
  • Speak.Act.Change Youth Advocacy Kit | HTML HTML
    by Break the Cycle for Hazelden Foundationy
    The Speak.Act.Change Youth Advocacy Kit is a service-learning, youth activism program designed to complement any basic dating violence education curriculum. The program gives students the tools to protect themselves and their peers from dating violence.
    + View Summary
  • Ending Violence | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by Break the Cycle (2009)
    This is a dating abuse prevention program with an interactive DVD curriculum to help educators engage teens on issues of dating abuse, healthy relationships, and legal rights and responsibilities.
    + View Summary
  • Dating Violence Youth Education Package | PDF PDF (38 p.)
    by Michigan Domestic Violence Prevention and Treatment Board (MDVPTB) (2001-2003)
    Developed for educators and others working with youth as one option to address dating violence in schools. It includes background information, lesson plans, educator sheets, student surveys and handouts, as well as a poster in both English and Spanish.
    + View Summary
  • It’s All One Curriculum, Volume 2: Activities for a Unified Approach to Sexuality, Gender, HIV, and Human Rights Education | PDF PDF (196 p.)
    by International Sexuality and HIV Curriculum Working Group for The Population Council, Inc. (2009)
    This curriculum provides concrete tips for applying a human rights framework and basic principles of learner-centered, interactive teaching in the delivery of sexuality, gender and HIV education to youth.
    + View Summary
  • Campus Toolkit | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence
    This online toolkit helps college students organize campus events, programs, and training on violence against women and its link to reproductive health.
    + View Summary
  • Teacher’s Guide, Interesting, Fun, and Effective Classroom Activities to Influence Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention | PDF PDF (8 p.)
    by American Bar Association (2006)
    This guide provides suggestions for class activities that increase awareness of teen dating violence.
    + View Summary

Health Care Professionals | Back to top

Health care professionals are uniquely positioned to identify dating violence among young people, as TDV may have several adverse health consequences. This section includes documents that recommend routine assessment, promote skills for recognizing the effects of TDV, and provide suggestions on teen dating violence prevention and intervention.

Help spread the word about healthy relationships! Download posters, handouts, palm cards and other free educational materials from loveisrespect.org and share them widely.

  • Hanging Out or Hooking Up: Clinical Guidelines on Responding to Adolescent Relationship Abuse - An Integrated Approach to Prevention and Intervention (Second Edition) | PDF PDF (64 p.)
    by Elizabeth Miller and Rebecca Levenson for Futures Without Violence (2013)
    This document focuses on the critical role of the adolescent health care provider in preventing, identifying and addressing adolescent relationship abuse. These guidelines are applicable to providers working in a wide range of settings serving adolescents.
    + View Summary
  • Teen Dating Violence and Childhood Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence: An Assessment Tool for Providers | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence
    This new assessment tool for childhood exposure to intimate partner violence and adolescent dating violence is available in two formats, for either the iSilo or Documents to Go text readers.
    + View Summary
  • Identifying and Responding to Domestic Violence: Consensus Recommendations for Child and Adolescent Health | PDF PDF (94 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence's National Health Resource Center on Domestic Violence (Revised August 2004)
    This document highlights the need for child health care providers to become actively involved in domestic violence prevention and provides recommendations for regular and universal screening for domestic violence in child health care settings.
    + View Summary
  • The Connection between Dating Violence and Unhealthy Behaviors | PDF PDF (5 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence (2010)
    This fact sheet presents data from various studies to show the connection between dating violence and unhealthy behaviors. Information on risks associated with witnessing violence as well as mitigating factors is also included.
    + View Summary
  • Reproductive Health and Partner Violence Guidelines: An Integrated Response to Intimate Partner Violence and Reproductive Coercion | PDF PDF (52 p.)
    by by Linda Chamberlain and Rebecca Levenson for Futures Without Violence (2010)
    This guide focuses on the transformative role of the reproductive health care provider in identifying and addressing intimate partner violence and reproductive coercion.
    + View Summary

Pregnancy Prevention Programs | Back to top

Teens in unhealthy dating relationships may experience coerced sex or birth control sabotage, behaviors which can increase the risk of pregnancy. Resources in this section provide practical guidance for preventing teen pregnancy by recognizing and responding to dating violence and reproductive coercion.

kNOw MORE is a national project designed to educate youth about the reproductive health consequences of violence and sexual coercion. The project’s goal is to open a dialogue and find a common language on the issue. kNOw MORE’s website features current data as well as stories of teens and women who experienced reproductive coercion of all kinds - from relationship rape, to birth control sabotage, to coerced abortion. With a blog, an RSS feed and downloadable widgets, it is designed to reach a young adult audience and open a dialogue on this emerging issue.

  • The Facts on Adolescent Pregnancy, Reproductive Risk and Exposure to Dating and Family Violence | PDF PDF (3 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence (February 2010)
    Violence limits young women's ability to manage their reproductive health and exposes them to sexually transmitted diseases. This fact sheet outlines ways that violence affects reproductive health and impacts risky sexual behaviors.
    + View Summary
  • Intimate Partner Violence and Teen Pregnancy Prevention | PDF PDF (4 p.)
    by the Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Family and Youth Services Bureau (2012)
    Teens in unhealthy dating relationships may experience coerced sex or birth control sabotage, increasing risk of pregnancy. This document provides practical guidance for incorporating IPV content and materials into teen pregnancy prevention (TPP) projects.
    + View Summary
  • Interpersonal Violence and Teen Pregnancy: Implications and Strategies for Community-Based Interventions | PDF PDF (40 p.)
    by Joyce N. Thomas, Break the Cycle Teen Center (April 2009)
    This presentation provides information about the association between dating violence and teen pregnancy, challenges faced by pregnant teens who experience abuse, and practice suggestions.
    + View Summary
  • Promoting Healthy Relationships Among Youth: Reducing Teen Pregnancy by Recognizing and Responding to Dating Violence and Reproductive Coercion | PDF PDF (25 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence for the Family and Youth Services Bureau’s First Annual Teen Pregnancy Prevention Grantee Conference (2013)
    This presentation includes information on the link between Adolescent Relationship Abuse (ARA) and condom/birth control interference, the likelihood of pregnancy among female victims of ARA, and the difficulty of negotiating the use of birth control with abusive partners.
    + View Summary
  • Vision for Healthy Relationships Education | PDF PDF (3 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence
    This document identifies some core components that provide the basis for effective healthy relationships education.
    + View Summary
  • It’s All One Curriculum, Volume 2: Activities for a Unified Approach to Sexuality, Gender, HIV, and Human Rights Education | PDF PDF (196 p.)
    by International Sexuality and HIV Curriculum Working Group for The Population Council, Inc. (2009)
    This curriculum provides concrete tips for applying a human rights framework and basic principles of learner-centered, interactive teaching in the delivery of sexuality, gender and HIV education to youth.
    + View Summary

FindYouthInfo.gov is the U.S. government Web site that helps you create, maintain, and strengthen effective youth programs. The FindYouthInfo Program Directory features evidence-based programs whose purpose is to prevent and/or reduce delinquency or other problem behaviors in young people. Included is a page about Preventing Teen Dating Violence providing brief descriptions of selected Teen Dating Violence Prevention Programs that have been evaluated.

Domestic & Sexual Violence Service Providers | Back to top

Domestic violence and sexual violence service providers face several challenges and obstacles when providing services for teen victims of dating violence. Limited experience in dating may make it harder for young people to recognize abusive behaviors when they occur. Even when they are aware of abuse, young people may not trust adults to disclose abuse or adults may minimize abuse in teen relationships. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and queer youth may experience additional barriers when seeking help for dating violence, particularly if it requires revealing their sexual identity. Furthermore, services, policies, and laws that protect domestic violence survivors may not protect TDV survivors. This section includes documents that provide information and guidance for working with young people from diverse groups, implementing a coordinated community-based approach to TDV prevention and intervention, and overcoming policy barriers.

Understanding and working with young people
  • Emerging Issues Facing Tweens and Teens | PDF PDF (3 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence (February 2013)
    This fact sheet presents data from various studies to highlight emerging issues facing tweens and teens.
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  • A Development Approach to Working with Teen Victims | PDF PDF (3 p.)
    by Break the Cycle (June 2008)
    This document offers suggestions and practical tips for practitioners working with teens. The document suggests that service providers have knowledge of adolescent development approach and apply this knowledge in their work with young people.
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  • Impact of the Law on Service to Teens | PDF PDF (3 p.)
    by Break the Cycle (November 2007)
    This document discusses the challenges faced by both domestic violence service providers in serving youth and challenges faced by teens seeking help. The document suggests re-evaluating program policies and structures to enhance services to youth.
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  • Technology and Teen Dating Violence | PDF PDF (4 p.)
    by Break the Cycle (December 2008)
    This document discusses the challenges service providers face because of advanced technology when working with young people who experience dating violence. The document provides suggestions for teaching young people to use technology safely.
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  • Runaway and Homeless Youth and Relationship Violence Toolkit | HTML HTML
    by the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, in collaboration with the Family Violence Prevention and Services Program of HHS (February 2010)
    This toolkit was developed by and for advocates in the runaway and homeless youth and dv/sa fields to help programs create partnerships, meaningful services, and effective intervention and prevention strategies for working with youth at risk.
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Community outreach and community-based interventions
  • Outreach to Underserved Teen Victims of Crime | PDF PDF (40 p.)
    by National Crime Prevention Council and the National Center for Victims of Crime (2012)
    This guidebook provides an overview of the challenges faced in conducting outreach to underserved teen victims of crime and highlights examples of the various projects and resources developed and implemented in local communities in the Underserved Teen Victims Initiative.
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  • Underserved Teen Victims Initiative: A Case Study Guide | PDF PDF (21 p.)
    by the National Crime Prevention Council and the National Center for Victims of Crime
    This guide highlights the campaign activities of each site chosen to participate in the Underserved Teen Victims Initiative program, offering a unique look into each site’s work and celebrates its passion for teen victim outreach.
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  • Youth and Child Advocate and Educator Manual of Activities and Exercises for Children and Youth | PDF PDF (235 p.)
    by the Vermont Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence (July 2013)
    This manual provides a listing of activities and exercises designed to be used by advocates and educators working with children and youth to prevent violence and foster healthy relationships.
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  • Reaching and Serving Teen Victims: A Practical Handbook | PDF PDF (44 p.)
    by National Crime Prevention Council and the National Center for Victims of Crime (September 2005)
    This resource discusses adolescent development, the unique impact of victimization on teens, & strategies for assessing teen victimization, creating outreach activities, making service environments teen-friendly, and tips for helpful interactions.
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  • Improving Community Responses to Statutory Sexual Assault | PDF PDF (33 p.)
    by Joyce Lukima and Allison Turkel, Break the Cycle & Office on Violence Against Women (March 2008)
    This presentation provides information about statutory rape, challenges in responding to it, suggestions on helping the survivors, and strategies for investigation and prosecution.
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Policies for mandatory reporting and confidentiality
  • Chart a Course: Policies that Affect Victim Services for Teens | PDF PDF (32 p.)
    by National Crime Prevention Council and National Center for Victims of Crime (2008)
    This booklet is a guide on examining policies for working with teens who experience crime and abuse. It provides information about mandatory reporting, confidential communications, boundaries, and building partnerships with advocates and schools.
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  • Confidentiality and Information Sharing Issues for Domestic Violence Advocates Working with Child Protection and Juvenile Court System | PDF PDF (16 p.)
    by Jill Davies
    This paper presents information about three laws related to information sharing: confidentiality, privileged communications, and mandated reporting. It includes information on making decisions on how to handle and use information about child abuse.
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  • Youth Services Policy Development Tool | PDF PDF (32 p.)
    by Break the Cycle (2012)
    This tool provides general guidance on policy development and a step-by-step process of building comprehensive, coherent, and youth survivor-centered organizational policies.
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  • Balancing Obligations: Serving Teen Victims and Mandated Reporting of Statutory Rape | PDF PDF (4 p.)
    by Break the Cycle (August 2008)
    This paper provides information about statutory rape and mandatory reporting laws for statutory rape. It discusses obstacles faced by service providers with regards to confidentiality and reporting and provides suggestions for overcoming them.
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  • Mandatory Reporting and Keeping Youth Safe | PDF PDF (76 p.)
    by Nahama Broner, Venita Embry, and Merissa Gremminger for the Administration for Children, Youth and Families, Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) (2013)
    This FYSB Webinar provides tools that can help advocates and practitioners develop mandatory reporting policies and protocols.
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Laws and Legislation | Back to top

The documents in this section provide information about laws and legislation related to teen dating violence and working with minors.

State laws
  • 2010 State Law Report Cards: A National Survey of Teen Dating Violence Laws | PDF PDF (114 p.)
    by Break the Cycle (2010)
    This report card assesses each state’s domestic violence protection order laws and how they impact young people who seek protection from abusive relationships.
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  • Statutory Rape: A Guide to State Laws and Reporting Requirements | PDF PDF (135 p.)
    by Asaph Glosser, Karen Gardiner, and Mike Fishman, The Lewin Group (December 2004)
    This report provides an overview of state laws and reporting requirements for sexual activities involving minors and individual reporting responsibilities. This material may not reflect the most current state law - users should confirm the information.
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  • Summary of DV/SA Confidentiality Laws | PDF PDF (27 p.)
    by American Bar Association Commission on Domestic Violence (August 2007)
    This document provides information on each state’s confidentiality laws for domestic violence and sexual violence advocates.
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  • An Exploratory Study of Juvenile Orders of Protection as a Remedy for Dating Violence | PDF PDF (172 p.)
    by Andrew Klein, Amy Salomon, Laura Elwyn, Amy Barasch, Jane L. Powers, Mary Maley, James A. Gilmer, Matthew Pirchner, Ian Harris, Jennifer Sarah Tiffany, Deinera Exner-Cortens for the US Department of Justice (2013)
    This study examines protective orders (POs) taken out by teens as a remedy for dating violence by developing a comprehensive portrait of their use in New York State.
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Pending legislation
  • Stop Abuse for Every (SAFE) Teen Act (S. 1447/H.R. 2689): Teen Dating Violence is an Education Issue | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence
    This 2-page document summarizes information about the “Stop Abuse for Every Teen Act” or SAFE Teen Act designed to help schools play an important role in preventing teen dating violence.
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  • State Law Guide, Teen Dating Abuse Education and School Policies | PDF PDF (5 p.)
    by Legal Momentum (May 2010)
    This guide presents state laws and pending legislation requiring school districts to adopt policies to address teen dating violence.
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  • Teen Dating Violence | HTML HTML
    by National Conference on State Legislature (Updated January 2014)
    This Web page highlights the role of policy makers in preventing teen dating violence and includes a list of state laws related to teen dating violence from across the country.
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National Programs | Back to top

While there are many promising teen dating violence prevention programs, this section provides information about those programs that have been implemented nationally. For more community-specific prevention/education and direct service programs for teens, please see the Teen Dating Violence Resource List [PDF] and Website Resource List [PDF] from the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (2004)

  • Respect WORKS! | HTML HTML
    by Hazelden Publishing and Break the Cycle (2010)
    Respect WORKS! is a comprehensive model of teen dating violence prevention programming to give middle and high schools, youth service providers and domestic violence agencies the tools they need to respond effectively to teen dating violence issues on and off campus.
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  • Safe Dates Program | HTML HTML (4 p.)
    by SAMHSA's National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (August 2006)
    This webpage provides information about Safe Dates program, which is a school based program for young people in 8th and 9th grades which aims to prevent teen dating violence.
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  • Teen Action Toolkit: Building a Youth-led Response to Teen Victimization | PDF PDF (168 p.) TXT TXT (168 p.)
    by National Center for Victims of Crime, Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), U.S. Department of Justice (2007)
    This toolkit provides guidance to implement the Teen Action Partnership (TAP) for Teen Victims program, encouraging youth leaders to change their communities’ response to teenage victims of crime, while building the resilience of the youth participants.
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  • Expect Respect: A School-Based Program Promoting Safe and Healthy Relationships | PDF PDF (85 p.)
    by Barri Rosenbluth, National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (2002)
    This document examines the issues of dating violence, sexual harassment and bullying, their interrelationship, and offers a rationale for school-based programs.
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List of Organizations | Back to top

There are many organizations that provide direct services to young people who experience dating violence, as well as information to adults who are concerned about young people. National and statewide initiatives and campaigns are also in place to provide training, technical assistance, public awareness, and community programming focused on engaging youth, adults, and community members to address dating violence. The following list includes phone or online helplines (national organizations only) that youth can reach out to for help. Also included are examples of national and statewide dating violence initiatives. Note that this list is not meant to be exhaustive but rather a starting point in your research.

Hotlines or Online Helplines

National Dating Abuse Helpline (originally known as "loveisrespect.org, National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline”): This hotline provides 24-hour national web-based and telephone resources to help teens experiencing dating abuse. Young people (as well as concerned friends, parents, teachers, clergy, law enforcement and service providers) anywhere in the country can call toll free, 1-866-331-9474, text “loveis” to 22522, or log on to the interactive website, loveisrespect.org, and receive immediate, confidential assistance.

The National Center for Victims of Crime: The National Center for Victims of Crime has a number of resources available to assist victims of crime. NCVC’s Connect Directory provides a fast and easy way for crime victims to locate services in their communities.  

The National Domestic Violence Hotline: This 24-hour national service is available at 1-800-799-SAFE or 1-800-787-3224 (TDD) to assist in safety planning, information and referrals to local agencies. Assistance is available in English and Spanish languages and interpreter services for 170 languages.

National Hopeline Network: The National Hopeline Network provides 24 hour suicide crisis and domestic violence service referrals for teens at 1-800-SUICIDE (784-2433). Callers are automatically routed to the closest certified crisis center.

National Runaway Safeline: The National Runaway Safeline at 1-800-RUNAWAY is a 24 hour confidential hotline for runaway youth, teens in crisis and concerned friends and family members.

TEXT 4 HELP: TXT 4 HELP is a 24-hour text-for-support service offered by National Safe Place. Teens can text the word “safe” and their current location (address/city/state) to 69866. Within seconds, users will receive a message with the closest Safe Place location and contact number for the local youth shelter. Teens will then have the option to reply with “2chat” to text interactively with a mental health professional for more help.

GLBT National Youth Talkline: This hotline offers telephone peer counseling from Monday to Friday from 5-9pm Pacific Time at 1-800-246-PRIDE (1-800-246-7743). Peer counseling service is also offered through email at youth@GLBTNationalHelpCenter.org

Rape Abuse Incest National Network (RAINN): The Rape, Abuse, Incest National Network provides 24 hours services at 1-800-656-HOPE. RAINN will automatically transfer the caller to the nearest rape crisis center, anywhere in the nation. RAINN also runs the National Sexual Assault Online Hotline, a free, confidential, secure service that provides live help over the RAINN website.

Organizations or Initiatives: National

Break the Cycle: Break the Cycle is a leading non-profit that works with youth, educators, service providers, and lawmakers to prevent and end dating violence. This national organization develops and operates programs designed to ensure that no young person is excluded from receiving the help, tools and information they need to live free from violence.

  • HOPE: HOPE is Break the Cycle's national membership program made up of individuals from all walks of life united to speak out against teen dating violence. Members of HOPE are a part of an effort dedicated to ensuring our young people have the right to have safe and healthy relationships.

Futures Without Violence: Futures Without Violence is doing innovative work to address dating violence. Through work with coaches, teachers, and parents, and public service campaigns aimed at youth, the organization strives to keep teens safe and stop violence before it begins.

Gay Men's Domestic Violence Project: The Gay Men's Domestic Violence Project is a grassroots, non-profit organization founded by a gay male survivor of domestic violence and developed through the strength, contributions and participation of the community.

Hear My Voice Campaign: Break the Cycle’s Hear My Voice is the first national campaign specifically designed to educate LGBTQ youth about dating violence. Since its launch in 2009, the campaign has distributed resources to nearly 10,000 young people and advocates in the Austin, Chicago and Los Angeles.

kNOw MORE: kNOw MORE is a national project designed to educate youth about the reproductive health consequences of violence and sexual coercion. The project’s goal is to open a dialogue and find a common language on the issue. kNOw MORE’s website features current data as well as stories of teens and women who experienced reproductive coercion of all kinds - from relationship rape, to birth control sabotage, to coerced abortion. With a blog, an RSS feed and downloadable widgets, it is designed to reach a young adult audience and open a dialogue on this emerging issue.

Love Is Not Abuse: The Love Is Not Abuse (LINA) Coalition is a growing national grassroots coalition of parents, teachers and ANYONE advocating for teen dating abuse education in every middle school and high school in the country. Break the Cycle is proud to be organizing the LINA Coalition, having been granted the program from Fifth & Pacific Companies (formerly Liz Claiborne Inc.).

The Network/La Red: The Network/La Red was formed to address battering in lesbian, bisexual women's, and transgender communities through a) the formation of a community-based multi-cultural organization in which battered/formerly battered lesbians, bisexual women, and transgender folks hold leadership roles; b) community organizing, education, and the provision of support services; and c) coalition-building with other movements for social change and social justice.

The Red Flag Campaign: Using a “bystander intervention” strategy, this public awareness campaign encourages friends and other campus community members to “say something” when they see warning signs ("red flags") for dating violence in a friend’s relationship. This campaign is a project of the Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance, and was created by college students, college personnel, and community victim advocates.

The RESPECT! Campaign: The RESPECT! Campaign is an initiative of Futures Without Violence (formerly Family Violence Prevention Fund) and was created to advance a national movement to promote healthy relationships through positive role modeling and respect education by providing parents, teachers, coaches and other role models with tools and resources necessary to teach young people about respect in relationships. Through this campaign, Futures Without Violence seeks to amplify a national conversation about the critical role that parents, teachers, coaches, and other living, breathing role models to young people have to play in helping all of our sons and daughters shape a world that is free of relationship violence.

Start Strong: Building Healthy Teen Relationships: A national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) in collaboration with the Futures Without Violence (FVPF), Start Strong is the largest initiative ever funded to target 11 to 14-year-olds, investing $18 million in 11 Start Strong communities across the country to identify and evaluate best practices in prevention to stop dating violence and abuse before it starts.

STRYVE (Striving to Reduce Youth Violence Everywhere): A national initiative led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), STRYVE provides communities with the knowledge and resources to be successful in preventing youth violence.

Teen DV Month: Teen Dating Violence (DV) Prevention and Awareness Month is a national effort to raise awareness about abuse in teen and 20-something relationships and promote programs that prevent it during the month of February. TeenDVmonth.org, also known as the National Resource Center for Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, is sponsored by Break the Cycle and loveisrespect.org as a collaborative effort to promote February as Teen DV Month.

Teen Esteem: It is the goal of Teen Esteem to equip, educate and empower teens, parents, educators and the community on issues related to teens and adolescent health.

That’s Not Cool: A national public education campaign that uses digital examples of controlling, pressuring, and threatening behavior to raise awareness about and prevent teen dating abuse. That's Not Cool is sponsored and co-created by Futures Without Violence (formerly Family Violence Prevention Fund), the Department of Justice's Office on Violence Against Women, and the Advertising Council.

A THIN LINE: MTV's campaign developed to empower youth to identify, respond to, and stop the spread of digital abuse in their lives and amongst their peers. The campaign hopes to spark a conversation and deliver information that helps youth draw their "digital line."

The Youth Initiative of the National Center for Victims of Crime: National strategic initiative to identify and fill the gaps in interventions to support youth affected by violence and victimization by building the nation's capacity to support them, while working to advance their rights and ensuring youth leadership on issues that affect youth.

VetoViolence: Developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to provide grantees and partners with access to training and tools that focus on the primary prevention of violence. The portal includes free training, program planning resources, and an on-line application for the creation of success stories.

Organizations or Initiatives: Statewide

ALASKA

Stand Up Speak Up! Alaska: A project of the Alaska Network on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Stand Up Speak Up! is a campaign and a movement of Alaska youth that are working to end violence and to create communities of respect. The campaign’s site offers information on respect and relationships and helps youth to connect with other youth that are interested in respectful relationships, being a leader in their school and in their communities, and ending violence.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Show Me Love DC!: A campaign to raise awareness about healthy relationships and provide resources for LGBTQ survivors of intimate partner violence.

FLORIDA

I Am Courageous: Sponsored by the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the State of Florida Department of Children & Families, the I Am Courageous campaign teaches youth how to use their voice to help end dating abuse. The campaign’s website offers information on relationship rights and responsibilities, as well as tips and tools for speaking out against abuse.

IDAHO

Love What’s Real, Center for Healthy Teen Relationships: A project of the Idaho Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence, The Love What’s Real initiative is designed to build knowledge and skills for healthy relationships. The Love What’s Real’s Real Moments. Real Relationships. campaign was developed for teens by teens. It features messages about building healthy relationships in ways that are relevant, respectful and meaningful to young people.

TEXAS

Start Strong Austin: A coalition of school and community partners led by SafePlace’s Expect Respect Program, this initiative has engaged youth, parents, schools, nurses and after school programs to promote healthy teen relationships and end dating abuse. Start Strong Austin strengthens youth leadership and utilizes innovative media strategies to build healthy teen relationships.

ILLINOIS, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS

"Start Talking" Campaign: Loveisrespect is partnering with Health Care Service Corporation and its Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans of Illinois, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas to inspire young people to start talking about healthy relationships.